The Photographer’s Diary : March 2014


It’s hard finding the time to sit down and write lately. I’m sure we’ve all heard that before, it seems to be a phrase that’s become part of my vocabulary lately. It’s true though – working full-time means that the brain just wants to switch off come 5pm. I have to say that I haven’t neglected the blog completely though; I have been doing a bit of forward planning about what’ll be included in these editions. I already know what May’s will feature – how’s about that!?

Following on from our last post where we did a bit of reminiscing and shone the light of day onto images that wouldn’t have normally, erm, seen the light of day, the March edition of TPD is back to documenting the exciting things that have happened over the past couple of months. Of course, I’m not saying that the first post of the year was a cop-out, far from it. I kind of enjoyed the experience – one doesn’t always get chance to go back though folders full of images once the chosen few have been selected. Watch out for future trawls through the archives – hopefully they’ll throw up some equally pleasing treasures.

Enough chat though, let’s get onto the matter in hand. The main thing I wanted to focus on (pun!) was my visit to The Photography Show at the beginning of the month. I’ve only been once before, back when it was Focus on Imaging, but with its rebrand and new team at the helm, I have to say it was equally as entertaining if not better. The only downside of course is that there is so much to see and do that you usually find your legs and feet giving up before you’ve seen everything you want to!

There were plenty of opportunities to photograph models and still life – I had a go at both although I was slightly too far away from the models to get any decent shots. Maybe they’re something we’ll come back and visit one day.

As a fan of landscape photography we attended a workshop on the subject which was very interesting. I always enjoy seeing other photographer’s work and hearing their thoughts behind the image. We were very lucky to get in – the queue for this particular one was still around the corner when they closed the doors. Being the planners that we were, we’d queued for a good half an hour to ensure a seat.

Before we left, we paid a visit to the indoor garden which supplied this edition’s images. I have to admit that I’m not a gardener and so therefore don’t claim to know any names of the flowers photographed, well, apart from Daffodils and possibly lilys – gosh, I’m on fire!

 

© Ben Lowe 2014

© Ben Lowe 2014

© Ben Lowe 2014

© Ben Lowe 2014

© Ben Lowe 2014

© Ben Lowe 2014

© Ben Lowe 2014

© Ben Lowe 2014

All in all, it was a very enjoyable (but tiring) day – a day I’m sure to repeat next year.

Photorealism Exhibition, Birmingham

I’d also like to mention a very exciting exhibition I visited at the Birmingham Art Gallery. Photorealism was a fascinating journey through a range of subjects and ideas with each image definitely telling a story. I was astonished at the quality of the work – the whole idea behind the exhibition was that every image was actually a painting, done in such a way that they looked like photos. It really was amazing to see the detail. There were a couple of standout paintings that really caught my eye. One was of a lady standing in front of car – the artist had captured the creases in her trousers brilliantly and that was what made it so amazing, the level of detail. Similarly, another of a jar full of sweets with every single grain of sugar painted in crystal clear detail.

There was one image that drew me back for several repeat viewings, one that I stood looking at for a period of time that was probably rather unhealthy. It was a fairly recent scene, one of a couple sheltering from the rain at a London Underground station. I’m not quite sure why I was drawn to this one in particular; it could be because it brought back memories of my many trips to the capital, it could have been the level of detail – how the artist had captured every single mark on the steps, the reflection in the rain water on the floor, or part of the road you couldn’t see through the entrance that was reflecting in a mirror. Who knows, it could have been all those things, but it was a very magnificent piece of work, one that tempted me to buy the accompanying book. Of course, every image was worth a second, even third look, but if you asked me which was my favourite then Leaving the Underground by Clive Head would win hands down. Have a look for yourself and see if you agree.

I’ll leave you to ponder that and see you back here in May!

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